MARC BENNO – Ambush – (A&M) – 1972

marc-benno-ambush

Apart from having a couple of Marc Benno solo albums and a couple of him with Leon Russell, I had no idea who Marc Benno was before pulling this out of the pile behind me.

Marc Benno fans may say "shame on you" but there is no shame in that. Benno isn't a household name and when he had his shot at the big time he was localised to the US and I was a small child in Australia.

But, Benno had a not insubstantial recording career throughout the late 60s and 70s, which seems to have amped up in the 2000s (no doubt due to the cheap recording and pressing available).

Wikipedia's entire entry on Benno is this, "Marc Benno (born July 1, 1947, Dallas, Texas) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist … Benno was a member of The Asylum Choir with Leon Russell in the late 1960s, and launched a solo career in the early 1970s, with his 1972 effort Ambush being the most commercially successful. He wrote the song "Rock 'n Roll Me Again", which was recorded by the band The System for the soundtrack to the 1985 film Beverly Hills Cop; this soundtrack won a Grammy Award. Benno also worked with musicians such as The Doors, Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, and Rita Coolidge. Benno was the second guitar player on The Doors L.A. Woman alongside Robby Krieger".

What it doesn't say is how he performed in Dallas in the 1960s with Steve Miller, Boz Scaggs, members of the Eagles and ZZ Top before joining Asylum Choir and going solo. He later toured with Rita Coolidge as her lead guitarist, opened for The Byrds at Royal Albert Hall in London, was Lightnin' Hopkins bandleader and lead guitarist, and then formed Marc Benno & The Nightcrawlers, which had a young Stevie Ray Vaughan on guitar.

Texas, 70s, old Afro-Americans … this is heading into white blues territory.

Benno says on his website (http://www.marcbenno.com/interview.php), "My first influences were hits on the radio, and the Cats Caravan Show on WRR radio. WRR played all the real good stuff, like Jimmy Reed, Little Richard and Ray Charles. Their theme song was "Night Train." The daytime radio played hits by the Coasters, the Drifters, and a lot of white artists, from Buddy Holly to Elvis, and whoever had a hit record. These hit makers came to Dallas in 1959, while I was working for my dad in the beer garden at The State Fair Music Hall. He snuck me in backstage, and my life was never the same. I met Sam Cooks, Paul Anka, and these guys throwing combs out the window to screaming chick fans. The show-biz bug bit me for good right then. It wasn't until I was 16 that I heard "Lightnin'" Hopkins over at a friend's house, and began to get into the blues. At Cains Ballroom in Oklahoma City is the first time I met him and ended up touring with him as 2nd guitarist. Everybody thought I knew him, but it was really Mance Lipscomb that I knew, and I thought Mance was Lightnin Hopkins when I first saw him at San Jacks Café in Austin. Mance gave me my license to play the blues"

He goes on to say, "Well, for years I listened to nothing but the blues. As has been said before, all the Kings, Juniors, Bigs and Littles. Lately, it's been nothing but Chet Baker. He is the most no tricks singer I've ever heard. My favorite unknown guitarist is Lenny Breau. My favorite pianist is Bill Evans. And I like Johnny "Guitar" Watson's Bow Wow CD. I've been playing piano a lot lately and learning classics, like "It Could Happen to You.", "Like Someone in Love', and some contemporary standards. My guitar playing has been used mostly writing originals for my new CD. But definitely Lightnin Hopkins, Jimmie Reed, Albert King, Kenny Burrell and Johnny "Guitar" Watson are my biggest influences. And jazz musicians are incredible. They have unlimited chops. They know their instruments. Of course, the classical masters are an inspiration when I'm relaxing".

Despite sidelines the blues are part of his musical makeup. That's why I approach this album with some trepidation. White blues, when done faithfully to black blues, leaves me a little cold and bored. It can never be as good as the black blues. But, if it is given a new set of clothes and taken out on the arm of the white musician then it can work.

This was Benno's fifth album and third solo album and it was 1972. The blues had gone through it's rock n roll stage, it's acoustic folk stage, its home grown white R&B stage, its British invasion R&B stage, it's heavy electric and acid blues stage and its funky stage.

But, rock blues was still very popular especially with its heavy electric and funk overtones.

Led Zeppelin, Blind Faith, Derek and the Dominos,  The Allman Brothers Band, ZZ Top, Mountain, Canned Heat, Cactus, Humple Pie,  Sly & the Family Stone, Cold Blood, Ides of March, Leon Russell, Delaney and Bonnie and many others were all doing well..

If you were a serious musician you played the blues.

Benno had his roots in the blues and clearly could play and sing (though his vocals at times aren't forceful enough), write and entertain. It was a no-brainer.

Benno plays the blues on this album in the laid back lazy and funky style as was the style at the time – Clapton solo, JJ Cale.

The problems of 1972 are subsumed into style over content, though the trouble of the times comes through in the mood.  Benno has separated the two album sides into two sounds. The first side is pure funk blues and more often than not it does just emulate the Afro-Americans but there are interesting asides – the chuggin saxophone and the slide guitar. The second side is blue eyed soul of the deep soul variety with moody keyboards and white boy bluesy ballads.

The band are tight Mike Utley (keyboards), Carl Radle (bass), Jim Keltner (drums and percussion), Bobby Keys (saxophone). They are tight and you have to be tight to sound this loose.

This album had a lot going for it but only reached #197 in the album charts. That was his highest solo placing.

Benno's solo career did very little., but should have done better.

For me, a little of this goes a long way unless it is really dressed up in new clothes.

Tracks (best in italics)

      Side One

  • Poor Boy – (Irvin Benno / Marc Benno ) – a very funky blues workout
  • Southern Women – even better. Guitar is by legendary native American session guitarist Jesse ed Davis while Benno is on piano. Muscular and fun.
  • Jive Fade Jive – an instrumental workout that is incredibly funky with some jazz overtones. Wonderful
  • Hall Street Jive – Slide Guitar by Jesse Ed Davis and a great tune. Some great asides.

      Side Two

  • Share – Horns by Booker T. Jones on this deep soul ballad. Very familiar but very good.
  • Donut Man – (Irvin Benno / Marc Benno) – a great reflective ballad, of its time but undeniably mood soaked.
  • Sunshine Feelin – (Irvin Benno / Marc Benno / Mike Utley) – standard white slow electric blues. The kind I find the most difficult to listen to.
  • Here to Stay Blues – (Irvin Benno / Marc Benno) – Shared vocals with Bonnie Bramlett. Bramlett has great lungs and this blues works.
  • Either Way It Happens – Bass – Ray Brown. Low key smouldering jazz blues with some squeaky vocals,

And …

I've said before a little of this goes a long way with me. There is nothing really new here (not even by 1972 standards) but it is done so well … I may just keep this.

Chart Action

US

Singles

Album

1972 #171

England

nothing

Sounds

Southern Women

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lEaz65Pe1eQ

Hall Street Jive

mp3 attached

Share

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqta0thq2JA

Donut Man

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FxP6sKrkb3g

Sunshine Feelin

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FUMqTZgOQsI

Others

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lMZsvAt9Zq8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GhVgADRyPfs

Review

http://www.robertchristgau.com/get_artist.php?name=Marc+Benno

http://www.allmusic.com/album/ambush-mw0001878728

Bio

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_Benno

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/marc-benno-mn0000955347/biography

Website

http://www.marcbenno.com/welcome.php

Trivia

  • Producer – David Anderle, Marc Benno
Posted in Blues Rock | Tagged | Leave a comment

LOS INDIOS TABAJARAS – The Many-Splendored Guitars of Los Indios Tabajaras – (RCA) – 1965

los-indios-tabajaras-the-many-splendored-guitars-of-los-indios-tabajaras

Will there ever be a Los Indios Tabajaras cult?

Is there a Los Indios Tabajaras cult?

There should be a Los Indios Tabajaras cult.

Los Indios Tabajaras, in their most famous and longest incarnation, are two brothers from Brazil who play guitar instrumentals (check my other comment for biographical detail).

Their record label played up the exotic foreignness of the music as well as its from a time past beauty. Words like "freshness", "uncluttered", "purity" and "beauty" are always thrown around on the liner notes.

This album begins with a heading "music in all its natural beauty" and ends with "This is tranquilizing music — heady with melody, smooth as velvet, languid without laziness.  You're invited to relax with Los Indios Tabajaras and their entrancing potion of beautiful music."

Recorded in New York in 1965 this is easy listening music for those (inevitably older types) who were tired of The Beatles, frat rock and surf music.

Mainly popular in South America Los Indios Tabajaras had broken into the US market in 1963 with a big hit "Maria Elena" (#6 pop, #3 easy listening) and were regular album sellers.

Most people dismiss Los Indios Tabajaras’ lush guitar instrumentals as elevator music, but there is a lot more to them than that. This is not a simple cash in on sounds of the day by a couple of guitar virtuosos. For on thing the virtuosity is not up front and in your face. What Los Indios do is create mood. Song selection, instrumentation, recording and the ears of Los Indios all combine to create a otherworldly, dreamy, relaxed mood. This is chill out music before it existed and it's organic and free range at that.

They did trad or faux trad South American music, classical, pop, and film songs, but, all are subsumed in their musical persona and within their guitar style.

This album, like most of their albums (that I have heard) after they hit it big in the US is a mix of film songs and familiar standards (some of which were pop hits at the time).

For me the music soothes and relaxes. The mix  of  familiar melodies and thoughtful expression of them massages my brain with its familiarity. Even if you were brought up on

punk music some of these songs are familiar just because they have been around a long time, been covered, been used in ads, in films and they are, errr standards.

This is music to be enjoyed alone.

The music could work for dinner parties though the clang, clatter and chatter would possibly drown out the subtle complexities (yes, subtle complexities) of the harmonics. Six people sitting around, not speaking whilst sipping on liqueurs would be a perfect listening environment … but where are you going to find six people in this age willing to do that?

Well, maybe if I supply the liqueur.

This album could be called, "Los Indios Tabajaras play Frank Sinatra and other songs". I don't know if this was intentional but there are five songs Sinatra did. Of course Sinatra was prolific, very popular and err, sang standards so there is probably nothing in it.

Tracks (best in italics)

      Side One

  • Love Is a Many Splendored Thing – (Paul Francis Webster / Sammy Fain) – from the 1955 film of the same name. The song won the Oscar for Best Original Song. The Four Aces went to #1 with it in 1955. Frank Sinatra recorded in 1964. A beautiful version of a beautiful song. The melody is perfect. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Love_Is_a_Many-Splendored_Thing_(song)
  • I'm Getting Sentimental over You – (Ned Washington / George Bassman) – Sinatra sang this song when hje was with the Dorsey Orchestra and recorded it on his album, "I Remember Tommy" (1956). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%27m_Getting_Sentimental_Over_You
  • Begin the Beguine – (Cole Porter) – The trad pop jazz standard. Sinatra recorded the song in 1944. Los Indios have increased the Latin in the song and it was always quite Latin. This is a good infectious version. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Begin_the_Beguine
  • The Washington Flowers – (Natalicio Lima) – an original and quite good
  • Harbour Lights – (Jimmy Kennedy / Hugh Williams) – I have always loved this song though the first time I heard it was in the late 70s on an Elvis Presley album. He recorded it in 1954 though it wasn't released till 1976 (on "Elvis – A Legendary Performer Volume 2"). The song has an otherworldly quality. With lyrics the song is bout a lost love or, rather, love ended by a departure. Without lyrics it still captures that. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harbor_Lights
  • You're Breaking My Heart – (Pat Genaro / Sunny Skylar) – Vic Damone had a #1 with this 1949 and it has been covered by many people. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/You%27re_Breaking_My_Heart

      Side Two

  • Lisboa Antigua – (Rômulo Portela / José Galhardo / Amadeu do Vale ) – a #1 for Nelson Riddle's orchestra in 1956 and then used as the theme in the film "Lisbon" (1956). Beautiful https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisbon_Antigua
  • The Greatest Story Ever Told – (Alfred Newman) – from the 1965 film of the same name. The title is the "Jesus of Nazareth (Main theme) from the film (I think). As you would from a song about Jesus Christ this is suitably reverential
  • Johnny Guitar – (Peggy Lee / Victor Young) – from 1954 film of the same name. Many instrumental covers have been done . This is beautiful with a hint of the western clip clop coming through.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_Guitar_(song)
  • La Novia – (Joaquin Prieto) – "The Wedding". In 1964, this version by Julie Rogers reached #2 on the UK charts and #10 in the US. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wedding_(song)
  • Luna Rossa – (Kermit Goell / A. Vian) – "Blushing Moon". Sinatra did a version in 1952. Another beautiful Latin tune.
  • Comme Ci, Comme Ca – "Clopin Clopant" –  (Bruno Coquatrix / Joan Whitney / Alex Kramer / Pierre Dudan) – Sinatra did a version in 1949. Pretty pop.

And …

Wonderful … I'm keeping it.

Chart Action

Nothing no where.

Sounds

Love Is A Many Splendored Thing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSpS38jJJkk

I'm Getting' Sentimental Over You

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ba-oFAS3je8

Begin The Beguine 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1U72Cw4sqNg

The Washington Flowers 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aS-j7TEp6E

You're Breaking My Heart 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMM4TU7t4Kw

Lisboa Antiqua 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jm1macOjfA

Johnny Guitar 

mp3 attached

La Novia (The Wedding)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pka_QPdbulw

Luna Rossa (Blushing Moon) 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2SjJGHkrQTA

Comme Ci, Comme Ca

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmhWEKl8XJw

Others

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPA6Dd3YCpk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cW8MgtyYzno

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5_tLfq9Pxg

Review

http://www.allmusic.com/album/the-many-splendored-guitars-of-los-indios-tabajaras-mw0000977617

http://mtwebsit.blogspot.com.au/2012/10/los-indios.html

Bio

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Indios_Tabajaras

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/natal237cio-lima-guitarist-best-known-for-the-million-selling-maria-elena-1876437.html

http://www.vinyltimemachine.com/Folder%20LA_LZ/los_indios_tabajaras/artists_los_indios_tabajaras.htm

http://thehistoryofrock2012.blogspot.com.au/2012/09/los-indios-tabajaras.html

Website

Trivia

los-indios-tabajaras-the-many-splendored-guitars-of-los-indios-tabajaras-back

Posted in Lounge & Exotica | Tagged | Leave a comment

MICKEY NEWBURY – Looks Like Rain – (Mercury) – 1969

mickey-nerwbury-looks-like-rain

Check out my other comments for details and background on Mickey Newbury.

You will need something on background because Mickey isn't a household name even though he was extremely influential as a songwriter.

He wrote songs that were covered by Elvis Presley, Ray Charles, Kenny Rogers, Andy Williams (!), Johnny Cash, Scott Walker, Ray Charles, Joan Baez, Dolly Parton, Tammy Wynette, The Box Tops, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, Nick Cave and others. He has been recorded over 1300 times by more than 1000 performers

Musicians know and love him.

The proof is in the covers. But, what is less discernable but is still there amongst the songwriter musicians is when they take his approach to a song when they write.

Newbury writes lyrics that are incredibly personal. His songs are about loss, love and life stripped bare of bravado. The songs are confessional, naked and sincere. Musically,  he always seems to be trying to make sure the music reflects the lyrical content in both rhythm and structure. He is not adverse to using studio tricks or sound affects in his music if that will help create the desired mood in the lyrics.

Newbury wasn't the first person to write personal songs in country. Hank Williams made a career of it in the late 40s and early 50s. Newbury wasn't even the only one doing in the late 1960s, Kris Kristofferson, John Hartford, Buck Owens, and others were doing the same.

Newbury was, perhaps, the most fragile and wounded of the new writers but he was also, perhaps, the least wedded to country sounds even though he embraced his country music history.

He brought post Dylan folky ruminations and a gentle pop sensibility to his country music..

For the purpose of this comment I will refer to something I have said in an earlier comment on this blog:

"It is Newbury's subtlety and thoughtfulness (sic) that put him at the forefront of "progressive country". "Progressive Country" roots lie in traditional country, roots music, folk, Americana, regional rock n roll and was largely comprised of younger country songwriters writing country music with naked honesty, which is no mean feet as country music generally is "nakedly honest" (think Hank Williams, Patsy Cline).  What they did do was write incredibly personal songs much like their "singer-songwriter" relatives in the pop field with an ear to the past. The other thing they did was sing their own material regardless of the quality of the voice. Consequently, they have put out many albums and are well respected but their songs are often associated with other singers. Think Townes Van Zandt, Danny O'Keefe, Kris Kristofferson, Willie Nelson, Terry Allen, John Hartford, Billy Joe Shaver, Butch Hancock, Gene Clark, Tom T. Hall, John Prine, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Guy Clark, Dennis Linde, etc. Some of those artists moved into the more up-tempo "outlaw country" whilst the rest continued on and eventually became the spiritual cornerstones of "alt country" in the 80s and 90s".

I don't move away from that but the more Mickey Newbury I listen to the more Newbury impresses me with his instinctual knowledge of American music. He is Americana, country, singer songwriter, folk, progressive country, old timey, pop and even rock at times. There are hints of all that in his style of music.

This was his second album.

Mickey found success in the late 60s as a songwriter. He was among the hottest new songwriters in Nashville at the time with many writing credits (and hits) to his name. He signed to RCA and recorded (and released) an album he was dissatisfied with ("Harlequin Melodies" (1968) ). The record label had their eyes on commerciality and produced the record accordingly. That album is undervalued – it may not have sounded like what he wanted in his mind but it was still beautiful. Mickey negotiated his way out of his contract with RCA, and signed with Mercury Records on the condition that he got total artistic control. For his second album, this album,  he left the mainstream Nashville recording establishment and went to the tiny Cinderella Sound studio in a Nashville garage.

And, there , he was allowed to put down the sound in his head. It may not have been Nashville country commercial but you can hear in Mickey's music The Beach Boys (apparently Mickey admired "Pet Sounds"), Simon and Garfunkel, Scott Walker and others.

The 60s was a time of change both musically and socially. The late 60s seemed to be at crisis point, between incredible achievement and age old strife. Man was landing on the moon, people were marching in Chicago, the Vietnam was ongoing, environmental degradation was becoming obvious.

Society was changing and there was new openness of expression in talking about feelings, politics, society.

Mickey was less interested in the big picture than how people communicate with each other in those changing times. In true country fashion though he had his eye on the past. These people and where they come from form a line where their problems are much the same as the problems of those than preceded them.

Thanks to changing times he was, however, able to discuss those problems in a different way to those musicians before him.

This album is a concept album not in a narrative way but by virtue all the songs are similar in tone. A country concept album, think about it. They were miles ahead of where mainstream country is now.

Admittedly, the album is also of its time. There are psych asides (well, it was 1969) and sound effects that would fit on an easy listening album (rain, wind, train whistles, ghosts)

But, the album is visionary. The listener is drawn into the narrators world. One of uncertainty, a dreamlike hallucinatory emotional landscape where heartbreak, loneliness, madness and despair exist all to the sound of wind chimes and rain.

It's as if you are sitting in a s mall country bar, after hours, on a dark, rainy night and listening to the musician unwinding and playing to himself on the stage.

He was backed on these records by Area Code 615, a group that included the cream of Nashville studio musicians—Charlie McCoy, Jerry Kennedy, Wayne Moss, Kenneth Buttrey, and Farrell Morris — much the same crew who had just backed Bob Dylan on his albums Blonde on Blonde (1966), John Wesley Harding (1967) and Nashville Skyline (1969).

Needless to say songs that evoke moods, stretched to lengths that weren't radio-friendly, are a hard sell. Mercury didn't like or didn't understand what they heard, but they released it Whether the record was pushed or not I don't know but there was little in the way of sales. But there was enough there for Newbury to keep recording and he was picked up by a label known for it adventurousness, Elektra.

Jerry Kennedy and Bob Beckham produced though clearly with Mickey had a hand in there. In any event Kennedy worked with a lot of Nashville renegades and is happy to let them express.

This is not country as you know it but is country and it is a highpoint of country singer songwriter

The liner notes by Kris Kristofferson.

Tracks (best in italics)

      Side One

  • Write A Song A Song / Angeline – a beautiful song. Like a country version of "Whiter Shade of Pale"
  • She Even Woke Me Up To Say Goodbye – The song had been recorded by Jerry lee Lewis in 1969 (#2 Country US) . Jerry Lee nails this and probably does it better though Newbury's woman saying "goodbye" has a different vibe and, probably, different reasons for going. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/She_Even_Woke_Me_Up_to_Say_Goodbye
  • I Don't Think Much About Her No More – Almost otherworldly with its heavenly chorus and asides.
  • T. Total Tommy  – a great song. Bouncy on the surface with some undeniably catchy lyrics. Too low key to be a hit but ….

     T Total Tommy took a toke of tea

            Black cats backin' up a big oak tree

            Tick tocks tickin' out a tune on time

            Last words lookin' for a line to rhyme

            Saw fishs swimmin' in the sea-saw-sea

            But me well I'm only lookin'

 

    Side Two

  • 33rd Of August / When The Baby In My Lady Gets The Blues – A nine minute song medley. The first part is a narrative disguising the fact that it has something to do with the life of Jesus whilst the second part becomes a slow trad gospel love song. The song messes with your head a little but the mood, and melody is irresistible.

            But now I put my dangerous feelings under lock and chain

            Guess I killed my violent nature with a smile

            Though the demons danced and sung their songs within my fevered brain

            Not all my God-like thoughts Lord were defiled

            Its the thirty-third of August and I'm finally touchin' down

            Eight days from Sunday find me Saturday bound

  • San Francisco Mable Joy – a young Georgia farm boy goes to the big city, gets lost and finds comfort in the arms of a prostitute. It ends with loss and one of life's cruel jokes. Magnificent and reminiscent of much Kris Kristofferson and Townes Van Zandt. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco_Mabel_Joy
  • Looks Like Baby's Gone – a low key type blues type with some nice gentle sitar and a "Sunday Mornin Comin Down" feel.

And …

Wonderful, magnificent …. I'm keeping it.

Chart Action

Nothing no where.

Sounds

Write A Song A Song / Angeline

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jW-bgGPfWU

She Even Woke Me Up To Say Goodbye

Live

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UM2PKcLSaYA

I Don't Think Much About Her No More

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=psxytXGaLNo

T. Total Tommy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lWg4boYuql4

33rd Of August / When The Baby In My Lady Gets The Blues

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=213l8-qm7Z8

San Francisco Mable Joy

mp3 attached

Looks Like Baby's Gone

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yc3JGMlhh94

Others

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiTjElq5Xjs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HK89Wcanbfk

Review

http://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/15473-an-american-trilogy/

http://tapeop.com/interviews/83/remastering-and-recreating-mickey-newburys-looks-rain/

http://therisingstorm.net/mickey-newbury-looks-like-rain/

http://www.allmusic.com/album/it-looks-like-rain-mw0000859579

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Looks_Like_Rain

http://www.robertchristgau.com/get_artist.php?name=Mickey+Newbury

Bio

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mickey_Newbury

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/mickey-newbury-mn0000525789

http://www.soundonsound.com/people/wayne-moss-cinderella-sound-nashville

Website

http://www.mickeynewbury.com/

Trivia

  • Personnel: Charlie McCoy – harmonica, guitar, bass pedals / Wayne Moss – guitar / Jerry Kennedy – guitar, sitar / Farrell Morris – percussion / Mickey Newbury – vocals, guitar
  • Rain & train sound effects courtesy of Mystic Moods Orchestra (from the LP: One Stormy Night").
  • This album is the start of a lose trilogy. Mickey followed this "Frisco Mabel Joy" (1970). The cycle of Cinderella Sound albums ended in 1973 with "Heaven Help The Child". Mickey himself thought of these albums as one piece in concept, theme, music and lyric (though similar elements traverse all his albums). Apparently he said, "“[They] all tie together in my head,” … “Some of the songs refer to the same situation, just looking at it from a four-year difference in time.”
  • Mickey would help Townes Van Zandt and other songwriters get started in Nashville, he was Townes' "manager" for a while.
Posted in Alt Country, Americana, Country | Tagged | 2 Comments

JOHN DENVER – Take Me to Tomorrow – (RCA) – 1970

JOHN DENVER - Take Me to Tomorrow

It’s hard to explain how popular John Denver was in the 70s, so just accept that he was.

He was everywhere … in the charts, on television, in films and on constant tour around the world.

He is, generally, assumed to be a country act because of the country themes in many of his songs. He didn't, however, fit into the traditional country boxes or even the new country that opened up in the 60s or 70s. Country bravado and strut is not to be found his music. His country is not of the open plains, the honky tonks or of lying women, cheating men or excessive whiskey and gin. It is the of the high mountains, clean air and thoughtful quiet contemplation.

Accordingly, he brought a folk sensibility and folk sensitivity to country which means it is barely what we assume country is, but it still is.

There are elements of country pop, singer-songwriter, and folk in his music, all done to an open gentle semi acoustic sound. If his music doesn't always sound authentically country it does always sound genuinely rustic, albeit quite smooth. It isn’t always evident in the music but it is evident in the lyrics and narratives that Denver was entranced with the American landscape, its native peoples, the flora, fauna of the land and the societal values of a time past.

That is what makes him country.

And, if you don’t accept that opinion, then you can accept the fact that country audiences accepted him.

Wikipedia … "Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr., was born in Roswell, New Mexico, to Lt. Col. Henry John Deutschendorf, Sr., an Air Force officer (who set three speed records in the B-58 Hustler bomber and earned a place in the Air Force Hall of Fame) and Erma Louise Swope. Henry Sr. was of German ancestry, and met and married his "Oklahoma Sweetheart". Denver's Irish Catholic and German maternal grandmother was the one who imbued Denver with his love of music. In his autobiography, Take Me Home, Denver described his life as the eldest son of a family shaped by a stern father who could not show his love for his children. He is also the nephew of singer Dave Deutschendorf of The New Christy Minstrels … At the age of 11, Denver received an acoustic guitar from his grandmother. He learned to play well enough to perform at local clubs by the time he was in college. He adopted the surname "Denver" after the capital of his favorite state, Colorado. He decided to change his name when Randy Sparks, founder of The New Christy Minstrels, suggested that "Deutschendorf" wouldn't fit comfortably on a marquee. Denver studied Architecture at Texas Tech University in Lubbock and sang in a folk-music group called "The Alpine Trio" while pursuing architectural studies. He was also a member of Delta Tau Delta Fraternity. Denver dropped out of the Texas Tech School of Engineering in 1963,[10] and moved to Los Angeles, where he sang in folk clubs. In 1965, Denver joined the The Mitchell Trio, replacing founder Chad Mitchell, which later became "Denver, Boise, and Johnson" (John Denver, David Boise, and Michael Johnson)… In 1969, Denver abandoned the band life to pursue a solo career and released his first album for RCA Records: Rhymes & Reasons … "

His fourth album “Poems, Prayers, and Promises” (1971), was a breakthrough for him in the US, thanks in part to the single "Take Me Home, Country Roads", which went to number 2 on the Billboard charts.

After that he followed themes and a style which varied only a little, till the end of his career.

When you are onto something why change?

He recorded nearly 300 songs, of which 200 of them he wrote. His career spanned four decades and his music appeared on a variety of charts, including Country and Western, the Billboard Hot 100, and Adult Contemporary. In the US he had 14 gold and eight platinum albums. He was loved around the world for his music and its message.

Allmusic, "One of the most popular recording artists of the 1970s, country-folk singer/songwriter John Denver's gentle, environmentally conscious music established him among the most beloved entertainers of his era; wholesome and clean-cut, his appeal extended to fans of all ages and backgrounds, and led to parallel careers as both an actor and a humanitarian".

There is something to be admired about this but it doesn't make country, alt country or neo-country heroes.

Gram Parsons, Johnny Cash, Townes Van Zandt and their crossover music with it's pain, despair and ambiguity makes for credible country counter-culture heroes.

But what he lacks in street cred (or is that trail cred?) he makes up with sensitivity, sincerity and a niceness that are wrapped up in an easy sing-a-long-a-bility of his tunes. He has something to say but he doesn't want to offend, he isn't strident or in your face despite the unequivocal nature of some his messages. He wants you to remember a tune and he had the folkies ability to turn words into moods.

Denver's sincerity doesn't extend to analysing his own personal demons in song, well, not directly or in any confessional manner. He had personal demons, but his image was quite separate. And when his image was tarnished, later in his life, by his drinking and associated allegations it seemed that much worse because it wasn’t expected of him.

Of course the truth is everyone has demons and those bits of darkness are hinted at in his earlier solo music.

This solo album (his second major release but third album release) is from Denver's transitional period between folkie and country. He was experimenting with the singer-songwriter style (as were a lot of ex folkies) as well as with rock sounds.

There are moments of darkness here (some which may put off traditional Denver fans) but it works and, importantly, it was a transition from folk that he needed to do. There are originals with bite as well as some well chosen covers which are darker still. But, there also hints of the pretty folk country music and open handed sincerity which would become his forte.

His voice is perhaps a little too sweet for this material (though it would serve his later material perfectly). In singer-songwriter folk we want out vocalists to be a little gruff, a little hoarse, a little lived in and a little raggedy around the edges. We want them world weary. And that's what we got with most. But, Denver has one of the purest voices in music with a natural vibrato and quality that, once heard, is remembered.

So, it is not surprising that his voice and music launched a thousand buskers

I haven't listened to every John Denver album but Denver's earlier solo and Chad Mitchell Trio work needs to be rediscovered or at least heard again. It may not be “up there” with his best but it is certainly worth a look and more interesting than when his work tapered off in the 80s and 90s.

Tracks (best in italics)

      Side One

  • Take Me to Tomorrow -a big rock beat (with keyboards up front) on this one with all the familiar late 60s themes …"do you care", "are you happy with your life"
  • Isabel – More like the John Denver we know though not as effortless as his later stuff.
  • Follow Me – More Denver we are familiar with though overproduced and with his voice slightly uncertain but haunting.
  • Forest Lawn – (Tom Paxton) – from Tom Paxton's seventh album, despite the album title, "Tom Paxton 6" (1970) (there was live album in there also). A satirical song on the funeral industry is quite funny and very in the style of the folkie.
  • Aspenglow – Aspen and glow …very John Denver
  • Amsterdam – (Jacques Brel, Mort Shuman, Eric Blau) –  One of Jacques Brel’s most well known songs originally sung in his French in 1964. There have been a number of English translations. John singing about Dutch prostitutes is odd but he does a good job of it even if his voice isnt gruff or dramatic enough.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amsterdam_(Jacques_Brel_song)

      Side Two

  • Anthem-Revelation – an up-tempo pop rock song with a  religious evangelical vibe.
  • Sticky Summer Weather – a strange one. Echoes of numerous later Denver songs though with a touch of Phil Ochs about it.
  • Carolina in My Mind – (James Taylor) – James Taylor's well known song from his self titled debut LP (1968). Denver has pitched this wrong. This would be perfect for his impassioned delivery, instead he gives it too much bounce. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolina_in_My_Mind
  • Jimmy Newman – (Tom Paxton) – another track from Tom Paxton's album, "Tom Paxton 6". This is cynical and strident and quite good.
  • Molly – (Biff Rose) – written by Biff from his LP, "The Thorn In Mrs. Rose's Side " (1968). This is very Biff Rose (with a hint of David Ackles), like a song from a musical stage show. Catchy but very quirky.

And …

Patchy but more good than not … I'm keeping it (perhaps)

Chart Action

US

Singles

Album

1970 #197

England

nothing

Sounds

Take Me to Tomorrow

mp3 attached

Isabel

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2fvqzh14dG0

Follow Me

Live

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gcu8XgWePMM

Forest Lawn

Live

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5S8Q2M4CBVU

Aspenglow

Live

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkHurhdlMvY

Amsterdam

Live

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nd_kR7XzlkY

Anthem-Revelation

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y93h1ZnJSGI

Sticky Summer Weather

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VeSSZM5i9gk

Carolina in My Mind

Live with Tom Jones

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYryU5b_10k

Jimmy Newman

Live

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXVbjpCYRCQ

Molly

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9INm_dCIWnU

Others

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZIHeoLjFaA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RzcoOGsXm80

with Mama Cass

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKdknYaSHgE

Review

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Take_Me_to_Tomorrow

http://www.allmusic.com/album/take-me-to-tomorrow-mw0000370955

Bio

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/john-denver-mn0000811622/biography

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Denver

Website

http://johndenver.com/

Trivia

  • John Denver the activist, on wikipedia: "Denver became outspoken in politics in the mid-1970s. He expressed his ecologic interests in the epic 1975 song "Calypso," which is an ode to the exploration ship and team of environmental activist Jacques Cousteau. In 1976, he campaigned for Jimmy Carter, who became a close friend and ally. Denver was a supporter of the Democratic Party and of a number of charitable causes for the environmental movement, the homeless, the poor, the hungry, and the African AIDS crisis. He founded the charitable Windstar Foundation in 1976, to promote sustainable living. His dismay at the Chernobyl disaster led to precedent-setting concerts in parts of communist Asia and Europe … During the 1980s, Denver was critical of the Reagan administration, but he remained active in his campaign against hunger, for which Reagan awarded Denver the Presidential World Without Hunger Award in 1985. Denver's criticism of the conservative politics of the 1980s was expressed in his autobiographical folk-rock ballad "Let Us Begin (What Are We Making Weapons For)." Denver was also critical of the Republican-dominated Congress and American Conservatism of the 1990s[citation needed]. He denounced the National Rifle Association (NRA) as a corrupt political machine that could buy off politicians[citation needed], and in an open letter to the media, he wrote that he opposed oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Denver had battled to expand the refuge in the 1980s, and he praised President Bill Clinton for his opposition to the proposed drilling. The letter, which he wrote in the midst of the 1996 presidential election, was one of the last he ever wrote. Denver was also on the Board of Governors of the National Space Society for many years"
  • Denver's second wife, Cassandra Delaney was born in Brisbane and is the younger sister of 70s TV celebrity Delvene Delaney

 

Posted in Country, Singer Songwriter | Tagged | 2 Comments

DAVID CASSIDY – Dreams are Nuthin’ More then Wishes – (Bell) – 1973

DAVID CASSIDY - Dreams are Nuthin' More then Wishes

David Cassidy was on a roll in 1973.

He was the teen idol. It is hard to explain how popular he was but think of the lunacy about One Direction or Justin Bieber at there most popular and Cassidy was bigger.

The Partridge Family TV show was still rating high on US TV (though they didn't make the Top 30 in 1973) and there albums were selling well (for those not in the know he was one of The Partridge Family, a musical family, on TV and the lead vocalist on record … see my other comments for biographical detail on Cassidy)

The Partridge Family had released eight albums between their first in 1970 and last in 1973. In the US, where they were more popular, one album had gone to #1, three others were Top 10, and another was Top 40. In the UK they had managed one Top 20 and one Top 40.

As a solo act he found more fame in the UK. His first solo album "Cherish" (1972) had gone to US #15 and UK #2 and his second "Rock Me Baby" (1972) went to US #41 whilst in the UK it was #2, Germany #9.

I'm not sure why. Perhaps the Partridge Family wasn't aired on UK TV till later which may explain why there wasn't any momentum behind The Partridge Family albums  but there was over the later released solo albums.

Either way this was David's third album.

And, this was the first real David Cassidy recording as he started exploring himself as a vocalist and moving away from the Partridge Family sound.

Cassidy has written and co-written songs but his real forte is as an interpreter of songs.

Cassidy, here, doesn't sound like the Cassidy from the Partridge Albums of the same year (Crossword Puzzle and Bulletin Board) and he is willing to take chances and bare intimate emotions through the music. This is his first singer-songwriter album despite the fact he didn't write most of the tunes.

He wrote only two songs here and admits on the album's liner notes that one of them was primarily someone's else's song. But, if you know this blog you will know that I don't care if someone writes their songs or not as long as they can interpret a song and make it their own or at least give it a different life.

And Cassidy could do that.

His great talent was singing. He may not be technically perfect but he is good enough and he is smart enough to look for the meaning in a song and interpret them through his experiences.  Yes, yes it sounds like a wank but it's true. All great interpreters from Sinatra to Presley do it  … though I'm not putting Cassidy in with Sinatra or Elvis.

And, importantly, he is smart. There is a lot going on in the music which, he as a big star, could have nixed. Given that, I assume he knew what he was looking for, and he wasn't happy with just a bunch of covers .. and he was just 23 years old.

And for someone you expected big production and up-tempo songs from this is restrained and (more) low key. There is very little electric guitar but lots of piano, congas and vibes. The album is dominated by Michael Omartian's piano though stellar musicians surround him: Ron Tutt, Milt Holland, Emory Gordy, Al Casey, Larry Knetchel, James Burton, John Guerin, Kim Carnes, Michael McDonald, Victor Feldman and many more.  

Tracks (best in italics)

      Side One

  • Intro – (Michael H. McDonald) – It seems this is the same Michael McDonald that sang backup on several Steely Dan albums in the mid-'70s, joined The Doobie Brothers in 1977 and went solo in 1982. This is as the title suggests an "intro" and sets the mood.
  • Daydream – (John Sebastian) – A #2US, #2 UK for the Lovin Spoonful in 1966. A great version of a great song
  • Sing Me – (Tony Romeo) – Romeo was a regular songwriter fro both The Partridge Family and Cassidy. Cassidy says on the liner notes that this is the most personal song ever written for him and it has a quasi gospel feel.
  • Bali Ha'i – (Oscar Hammerstein II, Richard Rodgers) – a show tune from the 1949 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical South Pacific. The songs has been done a lot but the big hits were all from 1949. Perry Como (#5US), Bing Crosby (#12US), Peggy Lee (#13US) and Frank Sinatra (#18). Haunting and well sung. A beautiful song and one you could see early 70s Beach Boys doing. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bali_Ha%27i#cite_note-1
  • Mae – (Gary Montgomery) – Montgomery was a songwriter who had been in the late 60s group Colours. Smouldering, gentle sexuality
  • Fever – (Eddie Cooley, John Davenport) – Little Willie John's song from 1956 (#24 US, #1 R&N US) though Peggy Lee's version from 1958 (#8 US, #5UK) (with reworked lyrics by Lee herself) is, perhaps, more famous. Elvis Presley released a near identical version to Lee's for his 1960 album, "Elvis is Back". There have been many other versions. Cassidy refers to Peggy Lee's version in the liner notes. Respectable. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fever_(Little_Willie_John_song)
  • Summer Days – (Tony Romeo) – a remake of a Partridge Family song and a hoot.

      Side Two

  • The Puppy Song – (Harry Nillson) – A Harry Nilsson song that appeared on his album "Harry" (1969). Nilsson's version is typically quirky. This is less so but only just. The title of the album comes from this song. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Puppy_Song
  • Daydreamer – (Terry Dempsey) – An original. Pure pop and very straight but incredibly catchy.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daydreamer_(David_Cassidy_song)
  • Some Old Woman- (Shel Silverstein, Bob Gibson) – written by folkie Gibson and country writer (and Dr Hook regular writer) Silverstein this song was originally released on Gibson's 1964 album' "Where I'm Bound". Well sung by Cassidy in an old timey way, err, updated.
  • Can't Go Home Again – (Dave Ellingson, David Cassidy, Kim Carnes) – a mid-tempo ballad that is laid back but quite dark.
  • Preyin' on My Mind – (Dave Ellingson, David Cassidy, Kim Carnes) – another catchy one.
  • Hold on Me – (Michael H. McDonald) – a fitting close. Quite personal and perhaps a comment on fame.

And …

Perfect for parties … I'm keeping it.

Chart Action

US

Singles

Album

England

Singles

1973 Daydreamer #1

Album

1973 #1

also:

1973: "Daydreamer" – Germany #27, Australia #10

Sounds

Daydream

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ZBBMTrjSig

Bali Ha'i

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FtApiCz_GFw

Mae

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhx07_mPiz8

The Puppy Song

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ey0YqqAbC6A

Daydreamer

Live

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLEvHoGkSJw

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIs4lvrvCJI

mp3 attached

Some Old Woman

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXvgUyccWQY

Can't Go Home Again

mp3 attached

Others

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5EqEYCEUAEM

with Glen Campbell (and Little Richard, Jerry Reed and Dom DeLuise !)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QciIPZra2k

Review

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreams_Are_Nuthin%27_More_Than_Wishes

http://nobilliards.blogspot.com.au/2011/09/david-cassidy-dreams-are-nuthin-more.html

Bio

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/david-cassidy-p5925

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Cassidy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Partridge_Family

Website

http://www.davidcassidy.com/

http://davidcassidyfansite.com/HomePage.html

http://daydreamingdavid.blogspot.com.au/

http://www.cmongethappy.com/home.htm

Trivia

  • The cover insert painting is Bruno Piglhein's 1925 painting "Pals".

 

Posted in Pop Rock, Rock & Pop | Tagged | Leave a comment

MELANIE – Sunset And Other Beginnings – (Neighborhood) – 1975

Melanie - Sunset and Other Beginnings

Ahhh, more Melanie.

This album gets panned a lot.

Not that I pay too much notice of what others say because every halfwit has an opinion. Err, yes I do have enough insight to see I'm knocking myself but do you pay any attention to what I say? …  (rhetorical question).

The thing I like about Melanie, apart from her voice, is that she is quite versatile and adventurous musically. And that is at odds with the usual descriptions of her in the all the usual music mags, books and forums.

But, you can only pick that up (naturally enough) after listening to a lot of Melanie. The albums should not be listened to in isolation otherwise they seem to be just random aberrations. When they are listened to en masse you see a musical persona appearing beyond the hippie chick with a guitar.

Melanie is quite the musicologist. She can write a very good tune but she also loves a cover. Here, she tackles things she, no doubt, heard as a kid in the 50s, and as a teen in the 60s. And, these two eras she would come back to on other albums. I don't think she is haphazard in her choice of covers or even that they were suggested to her. It seems to me that she has an emotional connection with the songs and something  that comes from her youth.

Now, I suppose many singers do this (cover the songs they loved as kids) but Melanie, in a sliding career circa 1975, has to be quite determined to record Broadway standards and 60s girl group songs.

And that is admirable but more admirable is the fact that her versions are not faithful reconstructions of the earlier songs. They have the sprit but not the sound.  Some songs you don't even realise what they are until you are half way through them. If you are going to cover it, put a personal stamp on it. Melanie does.

Of course she has surrounded the covers with her own tunes and they are always interesting as Melanie tended to wear her heart on her sleeve and her songs reflected her life at the time.

Melanie and her husband and producer, Peter Schekeryk had, around the time of this album, relocated their family from New Jersey to Tennessee, and, apparently, she felt reinvigorated by her new surroundings.  Perhaps that is refected in the albums title.

In any event Melanie does not do a stylistic flip flop. The record may have been recorded in Nashville with country instruments and strings (at times) but it has a New York sensibility and a California feel.

And this is the beauty of Melanie. Within her parameters and her musical world she created interesting and personal music. But, poor sales, and an image of the perennial flower child means her music was overlooked by the mainstream, and then  dismissed as the years past (the hard core Melanie fans know otherwise) The joy, now, though, for budding music archaeologists is that there are many Melanie albums waiting to be discovered.

Sunset and Other Beginnings would be Melanie’s final album on Neighborhood Records, which she and Schekeryk started in 1971, and closed down in 1975..

All songs written by Melanie Safka, except where noted.

Tracks (best in italics)

      Side One

  • Perceive It – a perfect start and the type of song Melanie does in her sleep. But it works.
  • Almost Like Being in Love – (Lerner / Loewe) – from the 1947 Broadway musical (and 1954 film) "Brigadoon" this has been updated to a soft rock sound with jazzy asides. As bad as that sounds it works quite well. In 1978, pop country and folk singer Michael Johnson gave the song another makeover that seemingly owes a debt to Melanie’s interpretation (right down to the prominent saxophone) and earned a US #32 hit with it. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Almost_Like_Being_in_Love
  • Loving My Children – more Melanie in her normal style and obviously speaking about something on her mind.
  • You Can't Hurry Love – (Holland/Dozier/Holland) / Mama Said – (Dixon/Denson) – a nifty medley. The former is the #1 1966 song originally recorded by The Supremes. Melanie does a folk pop version and it works. You can't sing along to it like you can with the original but it is pleasant on the ears.  Mama Said  was a US #4 for The Shirelles in 1961. This is also given the "modern" treatment and the two songs are meshed pleasantly. Excellent. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/You_Can%27t_Hurry_Love https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mama_Said_(The_Shirelles_song)
  • People Are Just Getting Ready – a dramatic song.
  • Ol' Man River – (Hammerstein II / Kern) – whoa. She turns this on it's head. The drama and sweat is gone and instead we have a bouncing pop country folk tune. I like it. The original is from the 1927 Broadway musical  "Show Boat"  (and the 1929, 1936 and 1951 film versions, as well as the Show Boat sequence from film, "Till the Clouds Roll By" (1945)) and then subsequently done by everyone including Paul Robeson, Frank Sinatra, Sam Cooke, Sammy Davis, Jr., Al Jolson, Screaming Jay Hawkins, Cilla Black, Ray Charles, Cher, Jim Croce,  The Beach Boys, Chet Atkins and Jerry Reed. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ol%27_Man_River

      Side Two

  • Got My Mojo Working – (Foster) – a 50s R&B song written by Foster but popularised by Muddy Waters in 1957. Conway Twitty (1964), Manfred Mann (1964), The Paul Butterfield Blues Band (1965), The Electric Prunes (1967), Canned Heat (1969), Elvis Presley (1970), J. J. Cale (1972), B. B. King (1977) and others. This version is quite funky and in the country-ish guitar breaks (not the pace) it sounds a little like Elvis' version. Perhaps it's a weird song for a chick to sing. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Got_My_Mojo_Working
  • Where's the Band – hmmmm, not too bad.
  • Dream Seller – (Clements) – written by Rod Clements of British folk rock band Lindisfarne who recorded this in 1971 as " Meet Me on the Corner". This one work perfectly for Melanie.
  • What Do I Keep? – another good Melanie tune with a discussion on yesterdays, todays and tomorrows.
  • Sandman – the couplet "Go away from my window /  Go away from my door" has been used in other songs. It works here
  • The Sun and the Moon – old school Melanie and a great tune with heavy folkie overtones.
  • Afraid of the Dark  – a nice spare arrangement which sounds like something from a Stephen Sondheim written musical..

And …

More than meets the eye …  I'm keeping it.

Chart Action

Nothing.

Sounds

Perceive It

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wx5wM6QgZMs

Almost Like Being in Love

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwIntWThxxg

You Can't Hurry Love / Mama Said

mp3 attached

People Are Just Getting Ready

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLWgku7pbbQ

What Do I Keep? –

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMRzgdke1sg

Sandman

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwIntWThxxg

The Sun and the Moon

mp3 attached

Others

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hlp3wmE4bbI

Review

http://www.allmusic.com/album/sunset-other-beginnings-mw0000855759

https://dkandroughmix-forgottensongs.blogspot.com.au/2011/09/melanie-sunset-and-other-beginnings.html

http://theseconddisc.com/2015/11/04/brand-new-melanie-morello-label-reissues-four-of-melanies-rare-albums-on-cd/

Bio

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/melanie-mn0000409670

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melanie_Safka

Website

http://www.melaniesafka.com/home.cfm

http://freespace.virgin.net/robert_ian.smith/Melanie.htm

http://www.melanie-music.org/

http://melaniemusicsociety.tripod.com/

http://melaniesafkarecordings.uk/home.htm

Trivia

Posted in Folk Rock, Singer Songwriter | Tagged | Leave a comment

JOHN HIATT – Riding With The King – (Geffen) – 1983

John Hiatt - Riding With The King

Who is John Hiatt?

It's a question that has been raised many times, sometimes unfairly, by others.

I have asked it, in a round about way, myself (see my other comment), but cut him slack because he deserves it.

Hiatt has critical status as a songwriter’s songwriter. Okay, that doesn't count for much but he has been playing guitar since he was 11, was a professional songwriter at 18, had his first hit ("Sure As I'm Sittin' Here" a #16 (US) for Three Dog Night) at 22, and has released 21 (mostly) critically acclaimed albums over 40 years. He has been covered by dozens of artists, including Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Iggy Pop, Willie Nelson, Eric Clapton, The Searchers, Delbert McClinton, Willy DeVille, Ry Cooder, Linda Ronstadt, Bonnie Raitt, B.B. King, Joe Bonamassa, Joan Baez, Paula Abdul, Buddy Guy, the Desert Rose Band, Jimmy Buffett, Mandy Moore, Emmylou Harris, Rodney Crowell, Dave Edmunds, Nick Lowe, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Rosanne Cash, Suzy Bogguss, Jewel, Aaron Neville, Jeff Healey, Keith Urban, Joe Cocker, Chaka Khan, Paulini and others.

But, despite that, and many good songs, the question "Who is John Hiatt?" is a valid one.

John Hiatt has had a long, schizophrenic career as, variously, a singer-songwriter, a new waver, an AOR dinosaur, a roots rocker, a country rocker, and an adult-contemporary singer.

And this album does not help. Prior to this album, and subsequently, Hiatt would change styles every couple of albums or so but here he changes styles during the course of the album and it seems to be intentional.

Side One was produced by Ron Nagel and Scott Mathews (both of the Durocs), with Hiatt singing and playing guitar and Mathews handling everything else whilst Side Two produced by Hiatt's friend, Nick Lowe (who played on it also) with a band assembled from Lowe's touring unit (which included Paul Carrack, ex-Rumour guitarist Martin Belmont, Bobby Irwin). Hiatt and Lowe would work often and even formed a band "Little Village" in the early 90s.

Hiatt is now 63 and he was 31 when this album was recorded and the album has many fine songs but suffers from the musical schizophrenia. Side One is (mainly) new wave spit and bile though surrounded in big 80s production (clearly a grab for commercial success … akin to the Cars or Huey Lewis). Side Two is more rootsy (even swampy) with a 50s retro vibe and more relaxed. The songs, generally, are sharp, cynical and filled with detail though ultimately there is something lacking and not just because of the schizophrenic sides. Hiatt's voice is passable but not spectacular and his emotions are occasionally restrained which is not a good thing because they sometimes feel like a "front" which is something you see in many English rockers where technique replaces emotion.

There have been many comparisons between Hiatt and Anglo rockers Graham Parker and, especially, Elvis Costello, which are apt. Hiatt's career at one time was not dissimilar to Costello's  and one could say, though people rarely do, "Who is Elvis Costello"?

This is an aside, but, Costello doesn't seem to be tainted with the same brush as Hiatt when it comes to his musical pond lily skipping. Maybe it's because he is English and the American Anglophiles always admire what they perceive to be an intellectual musician (yeh, whatever) testing his talents over a number of styles. And, when it comes to intellectual rock musicians (and this is an aside within an aside) they are, predominantly, English. It's as if they have adopted that stereotype whereas the Americans have been stereotyped as visceral. That is rubbish but I note that (mainly), on stage, the English are certainly (inertly) intellectual and the Americans are (spectacularly) visceral. I suspect though, that in Costello's genre skipping we can accept it because, deep down, we know he isn't American so  he can jump from one American musical idiom to another without local cynicism.

The answer to the question "Who is John Hiatt?" should be "Whoever he wants to be" and if that contains some of the reasons for his lack of major success then that is entirely a matter for him.

For us, there are enough joys, but we have to look a little harder.

Check out my other comment for biographical details.

Tracks (best in italics)

      Side One

  • I Don't Even Try – this one spits a little though the keyboards are too tinkly.
  • Death by Misadventure – (Hiatt, John Hadley) – co-written with Hadley a professional songwriter.
  • Girl on a String – not dissimilar to a Nick Lowe song (despite) the fact that he produces the other side. A good song only let down by the keyboards, again.
  • Lovers Will – a mid tempo ballad.
  • She Loves the Jerk – a folky rock number that again sounds like a Nick Lowe number and could have used Nick Lowe on backing.
  • Say It with Flowers – more spit with some great lyrics ("You believe nearly everything you hear/That kind of faith is gonna only bring tears") but the backing music is distinctly fisher price.

      Side Two

  • Riding with the King – The song came about when (side one) producer Scott Mathews recounted to Hiatt a strange and abstract dream he had of flying on an airplane with Elvis Presley, apparently. A mainstream swampy ("mainstream swampy" – sic) number which has a nice little groove going on it.
  • You May Already Be a Winner – another Lowe/Costello sounding number and a winner (sic).
  • Love Like Blood – more  faux swamp. Pleasant but unmemorable.
  • The Love that Harms – a jaunt which is a toe tapper.
  • Book Lovers – (Isabella Wood, Hiatt) – Wood was Hiatt's wife (she died in 1985 at age 30). Nice and quite bouncy.
  • Falling Up – a Bo Diddley beat rip off on this great retro rootsy hoot.

And …

Unsure, it is quite good (despite its faults) … I may keep it, I may not.

Chart Action

Nothing, nowhere

Sounds

Side One

I Don't Even Try

Live

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDEr8d60Snw

Death by Misadventure

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_DOBpsddII

Girl on a String

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BFIjmgJowlE

Lovers Will

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUJgWrSNcH8

She Loves the Jerk

Video clip

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLLmC4mH2i8

Live

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYoKpCas0IY

Say It with Flowers

Live

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gszqsJTwLK0

Riding with the King

Live

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9u79B5TrG4Y

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGt0uAC9FIE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RI7fe90-1iw

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD4HeC6UaLI

mp3 attached

You May Already Be a Winner

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TIGSpavdQzQ

Love Like Blood

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VcQ4T8FpKWQ

The Love that Harms

mp3 attached

Book Lovers

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArotWKR0nFg

Falling Up

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kYEXz4KDJxA

Others

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UrueP3aM40

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58hHVlZCfvM

Review

http://www.allmusic.com/album/riding-with-the-king-mw0000026429

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riding_with_the_King

http://www.robertchristgau.com/get_artist.php?name=John+Hiatt

Bio

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Hiatt

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/john-hiatt-mn0000812046

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ron_Nagle

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott_Mathews

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nick_Lowe

Website

http://www.johnhiatt.com/

http://ronnaglemusic.com/site/music-videos/durocs-it-hurts-to-be-in-love/

http://www.scottmathews.com/

http://nicklowe.com/

Trivia

  • The title song was later covered (with reworked lyrics by Hiatt) by B.B. King and Eric Clapton on their album of the same name from 2000.
Posted in Roots Rock, Singer Songwriter | Tagged | Leave a comment

FELIX CAVALIERE – Felix Cavaliere – (Bearsville) – 1974

Felix Cavaliere - Felix Cavaliere

I've nattered on about Cavaliere solo and with his time in the Young Rascals on other posts so check them out for biographical detail and bits and pieces of errr,  whatever.

This, here, naturally enough, given the self title, is Cavaliere's first solo album after The Young Rascals (or the Rascals as they were then known) folded.

In some ways it is a calculated affair. Cavaliere doesn't stray far from the blue eyed rock and soul (and pop rock Latin, and lite jazz influences) that made him  a great vocalist with The Rascals. Likewise, on board is Todd Rundgren, 26 year old wizz kid producer to co-produce with Cavaliere, and surrounding them, amongst others, are Todd Rundgren himself on guitar and well known sessionists Elliot Randall and John Hall also on guitar, Gualberto Garcia Perez on flamenco guitar, Hank Devito on pedal steel guitar, Jack Scarangella and Kevin Ellman on drums and Cissy Houston on backing vocals.

But, calculated or not, this may not be a bad thing. Cavaliere is playing to his strengths. All the songs are written by him with Carman Moore who was the "musical consultant" (my italics) and sting arranger. Moore was (is) a classically trained Afro-American composer who clearly has an influence on the sound on this album. There are a lot of things going on, all sorts of instruments, horns, strings, synths and non-standard percussion.

It is of its time though and its time isn't bad but there is a touch of dull soft rock creeping in, and a slickness and pop sheen which is at odds with some of the "street" sentiments in the music (Rundgren's influence I suspect).

It all looked good on paper, and musically, The Rascals had been heading this way, but in hindsight Cavaliere would have been better returning to his rock and soul roots, stripping down and belting out. A cult was developing for rock and rollers which Cavaliere could easily have slipped into. I'm not sure if it would have helped his fortunes but it would have made his recorded works if he had recorded in that style more popular today (perhaps).

But, like The Rascals declining fortunes this album did nothing. Cavaliere was still a major player but marginalised by new trends that had come or by the lack of a hit.

Tracks (best in italics)

      Side One

  • A High Price to Pay – this is light and bouncy and the influence of Moore ic slear with wood winds and what not making this stand out a little moore (sic)  than it would otherwise
  • I Am a Gambler – a would be tough song which does quite work a "street" song but is quite pleasant as a pop song.
  • I've Got a Solution – Faux country corn, like a theme song to a B action film written by Jim Croce that is quite a lot of fun in a dumb way.
  • Everlasting Love – not the Robert Knight / U2 song.
  • Summer in El Barrio – A Latin flavour with a hint of the street. Springsteen was tapping into this a lot better with a direct approach whereas this has leaning to Santana. Still, it's very good.
  • Long Times Gone – a semi-dramatic piece with quasi rock Broadway overtones.

      Side Two

  • Future Train – A good sentiment and a touch of the O'Jays at their softest. It is very slick and the synth sounds very weird in these surrounds, kind of Fischer Price..
  • Mountain Man – a funky tune which depite the tile doesnt have any country overtones.
  • Funky Friday – quite errr, funky. And Cavaliere manages to sound quite black like some sort of Stevie Wonder.
  • It's Been a Long Time – a Latin influenced pop and soul tune which is a stand out. It's fluff but there is a lot going on which makes it enjoyable.
  • I am Free – a psychedelic freakout which has Rundgren written all over it. It doesn't fit in and it is totally over the top and at six plus minutes perhaps a little too long but at least it's not boring. In fact it grows on you.

And …

Very patchy but … I'm keeping it.

Chart Action

Nothing nowhere

Sounds

Full album

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_HOGgf5MTnU

Summer in El Barrio

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJ44ME-ubxs

It's Been a Long Long Time

mp3 attached

I am Free

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gC4gTWqc8sI

Others

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fIDPD3rbIrI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Bj9R_SOsco

Review

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felix_Cavaliere_(album)

http://theseconddisc.com/2012/02/29/good-lovin-felix-cavaliere-teams-with-todd-rundgren-laura-nyro-leslie-west-dino-danelli-on-bearsville-reissue/

http://www.allmusic.com/album/felix-cavaliere-mw0000761887

Bio

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felix_Cavaliere

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/felix-cavaliere-mn0000169201/biography

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/the-rascals-mn0000493122/biography

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rascals

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Todd_Rundgren

Website

http://www.felixcavalieremusic.com/

http://www.carmanmoore.com/

Trivia

  • Moore also worked on Cavaliere's next album, "Destiny" (1974).
  • Fabulous Rhinestones drummer Jack Scarangella who plays session here would join Cavalierie (and future Ace Frehley Kiss replacement) Vinnie Vincent's (aka Vinnie Cusano) in the band Treasure which release one self titled album in 1977.
Posted in Pop Rock, Rock & Pop, Soft Rock | Tagged | Leave a comment

EMITT RHODES – Farewell to Paradise – (Dunhill) – 1973

Emitt Rhodes - Farewell To Paradise

I have commented on Rhodes' other albums on this blog. There you will also find biographical detail on him.

He, like Nick Drake, has come to venerated after the fact. A cult hero for music hipsters to rally around. Unlike Drake, though, Rhodes lived to see the adulation (no matter how small) and even released a new album, "Rainbow Ends", earlier this year (2016).

Rhodes, when discussed in the press (an, errr here) will always have Paul McCartney mentioned somewhere in the discussion. It is clear that Rhodes was influenced by McCartney but to forever refer to him as some sort McCartney remora is unfair. Rhodes had progressed musically and was commencing, with this album, to break free of the McCartney descriptions. Apart from utilising other instruments he is aware of what is happening around him musically. His song writing has moved into singer songwriter territory (though not exclusively) and there are some funky tunes, jazzy touches and a bit of everything else to go along with the pop orchestrations.

That doesn't mean this album is better than his earlier ones, just that Rhodes was exploring other territory.

But, it ended here. This was to be his last album for 43 years. As the armchair critics love to point out, even the album's title, "Farewell to paradise" is sort of prophetic.

Rhodes had had enough of the music industry and his personal life was unravelling. He called it quits.

Whether he had that state of mind at the time of writing or recording this album I do not know but there are enough signposts here to suggest that he wasn't the happiest camper though he wasn't morose either. In fact there is more than a little optimism (albeit melancholic optimism) on this album which people seem to ignore, probably because it doesn't fit in well with their already preconceived review.

Then again, the US in 1973 wasn't all fun and games with it's increase in urban violence, urban degradation, hurricanes, airplane crashes, the Watergate scandal, increased militancy of the American Indian Movement who occupy Wounded Knee, and its ongoing Vietnam War, which will end shortly though not before  resumed bombing of Hanoi and Haiphong. Farewell to Paradise could be an observation on the external world not just the personal or internal one.

Oh, and "the whole album was written, arranged, produced, recorded, engineered and all instruments performed by Emitt Rhodes" at his home.

Of course, that wouldn't mean shit if the music wasn't good, but it is.

Now, if only Val Stöecklein would be rediscovered.

How do I start a (music) cult?

Tracks (best in italics)

      Side One

  • Warm Self Sacrifice – Rhodes may have been exploring music beyond McCartney but  here is doing a McCartney impersonation.
  • See No Evil – a gentle mid tempo ballad that sounds like what McCartney would have if he had moved into soft rock. OK, I' have to stop with the McCartney observations.
  • Drawn to You – a gentle funky workout and very engaging.
  • Blue Horizon – A beautiful faux country number with a touch of John Denver.
  • Shoot the Moon – very funky by Rhodes standards.
  • Only Lovers Decide – a beautiful ballad as good as anything else from the era.

      Side Two

  • Trust Once More – another ballad and another winner.
  • Nights Are Lonely – a rock track. It doesn't "rock out" but it does have a rock groove. Quite unusual for Rhodes.
  • Bad Man – this one is all over the place, part McCartney (I tried not to use him), part Nilsson, part 70s era Tim Buckley.
  • In Desperate Need – another funky workout which is entertaining.
  • Those That Die –  (from Tame the Lion) – a short rumination on war.
  • Farewell to Paradise – Here Rhodes is moving in on Jimmy Buffett Florida keys territory. The song is gentle and quite relaxing, though never as laid back as anything Buffet would do.

And …

Not as good as his first two albums but there are tracks of individual brilliance and it is still better than a lot of other music from 1973. … I'm keeping it.

Chart Action

Nothing nowhere.

Sounds

Warm Self Sacrifice 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-mLR8SqV_Q

See No Evil 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i9dg6yiWZac

Blue Horizon 

mp3 attached

In Desperate Need

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBMeZ7P5_0M

Farewell to Paradise 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TORBKHsPQU8

Others

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7vn_TTrJM4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwklFEv0Z68

Review

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farewell_to_Paradise

http://www.allmusic.com/album/farewell-to-paradise-mw0000539046

http://secretvault.blogspot.com.au/2007/10/emitt-rhodes-farewell-to-paradise-this.html

Bio

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/emitt-rhodes-p20157/biography

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emitt_Rhodes

http://www.uncut.co.uk/reviews/album/emitt-rhodes-rainbow-ends

Website

http://www.emittrhodesmusic.net/

Trivia

  • Pop wunderkind Curt Boettcher was the mixdown engineer
Posted in Baroque Pop, Singer Songwriter | Tagged | Leave a comment

(PAUL REVERE & THE) RAIDERS – Country Wine – (Columbia) – 1972

Raiders - Country Wine

This is the last album of the original Paul Revere and the Raiders despite just being called "Raiders", a name they had used over their preceding two albums, Collage (1970) and Indian Reservation (1971). Importantly, both Paul Revere (the keyboardist) and Mark Lindsay (the vocalist) are still here with several long time Raiders members.

At the time despite the success of the single "Indian Reservation" (#1, 1971 US) their fortunes were dwindling, or so the usually told narrative goes.

Sure there hits weren't as frequent as they had been but they were hardly washed up and this certainly wasn't meant to be their last album as there were subsequent singles and songs recorded for a follow up album (that never came) before the band called it quits in 1976.

The Raiders always had their ear to the ground when it came to trends in music and perhaps have been criticised a little for that, though no one seems to complain about The Rolling Stones doing it (R&B, psych country, country gospel, R&B, rock n roll and even disco) or The Beatles (country, Americana, and big pop).

So this album is very 1972 with country influences, gospel influences, rock n roll, and big soulful adult pop – all popular musical styles of the day

The Raiders were certainly open to and incorporated these influences but those influences had all been explored before and are part of their musical make-up. Country soul and gospel had been referenced before especially in "Goin’ To Memphis" (1967), adult pop In their last preceding three or so albums (and on Mark Lindsay's solo albums of the time), rock n roll from their earliest days.

The trouble is, at least to the greater public, the albums come out a little schizophrenic, incorporating all the influences across songs rather looking for one dominant style to effect the whole album. You can point to the Stones country rock album, R&B album psych album, disco-ish album but with the Raiders it's not that clear cut as each album  (especially, and mainly, their later ones) has songs that bounce from genre to genre.

The album comes across almost as a collection of singles and there is nothing wrong with that apart from the fact that their (former) audience had now grown up and become more album oriented.

Clearly this was a conscious decision on the part of the Raiders (and something they had always done to varying degrees) but, with hindsight, it perhaps would have been better to focus.

These all sound like negatives and they are but only to the extent of why (perhaps) The Raiders later albums are not as well known as they should be.

Whether this album is a deliberately varied approach, or simply directionless doesn't matter because, musically, there is gold scattered across the album.

The back cover of the album shows the band comprising Mark Lindsay (lead vocals), Paul Revere (keyboards), Keith Allison (bass and guitar, who had replaced Phil Volk), Freddy Weller (guitar, who had replaced Jim Valley) and Mike "Smitty" Smith (drums, who had already been a member in the 1960s, left and then returned and replaced Joe Correro Jr. in 1970).

The band play well … no one could ever say the Raiders can't play. And that is impressive given the different styles present on this album.

I note it's another one of those albums where they put all the fast songs on one side (side one here) and the slow ones on the other side.

All the songs are written by the band or (seem to be) written for the band by professional songwriters. Lindsay produced.

Tracks (best in italics)

      Side One

  • Country Wine – (E. Villareal, W. Watkins) – written for the band. Big up-tempo pop with a country flavour, like a more mainstream Delaney & Bonnie. Perfect for television talk show guest spots. It is undeniably catchy though.
  • Powder Blue Mercedes Queen – (Mark Lindsay) – Bad Company, free and Mountain are channelled here for this heavier rocker in the "Mississippi Queen" style.
  • Hungry For Some Lovin' – (Robert Siller) – This is a good soulful number in "Aint No Mountain High Enough" style.
  • Baby Make Up Your Mind – (John P'Andrea, John Porter) – big soulful pop with some funky asides
  • Take A Stand – (Mark Lindsay, Keith Allison) – thematically very much of it's time, "everybody's got to take a stand". This has a great groove going with nods to War.

      Side Two

  • Where Are Your Children – (Leslie Ward Chandler) – Big, straight adult and family pop with a touch of Las Vegas. Lindsay loved this stuff (as his solo albums suggest) and he can sure sing it. This is mush but irresistible.
  • Ballad Of The Unloved – (P. Weiss, S. English) – pure big pop … and quite mushy as the title would suggest, but quite good.
  • American Family – (Alan Earle O'Pay) – more big pop with a depressing and, perhaps, a non commercial theme though there is optimism in there … "The American Family is dying, the American marriage is through,  though that doesn't mean it's true". I don't know if there is a misprint and the writer is meant to be Alan O'Day but in any event it sounds very much something written by Jimmy Curtiss. Very catchy though.
  • Golden Girls Sometimes – (M. Lindsay, K. Allison) – country folk pop and quite beguiling.
  • Farewell To A Golden Girl – (Mark Lindsay) – a gentle instrumental (with a spoken bridge) that closes nicely though it sounds like something from the late 1960s.

And …

A solid album by a band I love … I'm keeping it.

Chart Action

US

Singles

1972  Powder Blue Mercedes Queen  The Billboard Hot 100  #54 

1972  Country Wine  The Billboard Hot 100  #51 

Album

England

nothing

Sounds

Country Wine

Live

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0hTT_TJwQg&list=PL72FA488638464D5E

mp3

Powder Blue Mercedes Queen

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uvk9FPhQDLE

Hungry For Some Lovin'

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TMv9aoXuDsc

Baby Make Up Your Mind

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qnk_unTIgHs

Take A Stand  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Bej6h7REGw

Where Are Your Children

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fRq2KhB8ueI

American Family

mp3

Golden Girls Sometimes

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wv-3wPwrpa4

Others

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xmv6lPfnocs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioufyn6j3cU

Review

http://www.allmusic.com/album/country-wine-plus-mw0001879169

http://rockasteria.blogspot.com.au/2014/05/raiders-country-wineplus-1971-74-us.html

Bio

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Revere_%26_the_Raiders

http://www.musoscribe.com/features/paul_revere_and_the_raiders.shtml

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Lindsay

http://www.allmusic.com/artist/freddy-weller-p21369/biography

Website

http://www.paulrevereandtheraiders.com/

http://www.marklindsay.com/

Trivia

 

RIP: Alan Vega

 

Posted in Adult Pop, Country Soul | Tagged | Leave a comment